Researcher Spotlights


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Greg Spyreas

Greg Spyreas is a plant ecologist and botanist with the Illinois Natural History Survey. His research area is applied ecology that aims to bring about better conservation, restoration, management, monitoring, and understanding of natural areas and their floras/faunas, especially those of Midwestern North America. Greg published data from a longitudinal assessment of milkweed populations in the Illinois landscape and possible correlations with monarch declines.

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Loren Merrill

I am a postdoctoral researcher at the Illinois Natural History Survey working with T.J. Benson (Avian Ecologist, INHS) examining the influence of different land-cover types on the health and condition of shrubland birds. Prior to joining INHS, I did a one year postdoc with Jennifer Grindstaff at Oklahoma State University examining the impacts of early-life stressors on short and long-term trait expression in zebra finches. I conducted my PhD at the University of California, Santa Barbara on life-history strategies and ecophysiology of blackbirds. I am an avid birder and nature photographer and am happiest when immersed in wild places.

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Bryan M. Reiley

A graduate student at the University of Illinois / Illinois Natural History Survey, Reiley is working on his PhD in the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences. His recent work found population declines of Swainson's warblers following catastrophic flooding events.

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Lindsay Clark

I am a plant geneticist with particular interests in polyploidy, population genetics, and the development of novel algorithms and software for the analysis of molecular markers. I am currently a research specialist in the lab of Prof. Erik Sacks in the Department of Crop Sciences at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. I study genetic and phenotypic diversity of Miscanthus, a perennial grass used for bioenergy and biomass, and have made discoveries about its evolutionary history in the wild and in cultivation.